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Citation Information

Type Working Paper - CSAE Working Paper WPS/2013-12
Title Tribe or title? Ethnic enclaves and the demand for formal land tenure in a Tanzanian slum
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2013
Page numbers 1-52
URL http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/workingpapers/pdfs/csae-wps-2013-12.pdf
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between ethnic heterogeneity and the demand for formal land tenure in urban Tanzania. Using a unique census of two highlyfractionalized unplanned settlements in Dar es Salaam, I show that households located near coethnics are significantly less likely to purchase a limited form of land tenure recently offered by the government. I attempt to address one of the chief concerns - endogenous sorting of households - by conditioning on a household’s choice of coethnics neighbors upon arrival in the neighborhood. I also find that coethnic residence predicts lower levels of perceived expropriation risk, but not perceived access to credit
nor contribution to local public goods. These results suggest that close-knit ethnic groups may be less likely to accept state-provided goods due to their ability to generate reasonable substitutes, in this case protection from expropriation. The results are robust to different definitions of coethnicity and spatial cut-offs, controls for family ties and religious similarity as well as spatial fixed effects. Finally, the main result is confirmed using a large-scale administrative data-set covering over 20,000 land parcels in the city, exploiting ethnically-unique last names to predict tribal affiliation.

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Copyright DataFirst, University of Cape Town